Pow 4930/6930 (sections 22C0/1F57) Brazilian Science Fiction



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INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

Instructor: Dr. M. Elizabeth Ginway

Office: 149 Dauer Hall

Email: eginway@ufl.edu

Office Phone: (352) 273-3745

Office hours: Thursday 3-5, Friday 3-4


STATEMENT ON LANGUAGE USE IN THE CLASSROOM

Following departmental policy, this course will be taught in Portuguese. Research in language teaching and learning has shown that language instruction must provide significant levels of meaningful communication and interactive feedback in the target language in order for students to develop language and cultural proficiency. The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages recommends that language educators and their students use the target language as exclusively as possible (at least 90%) at all levels of instruction. The Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies follows this recommendation in all coursework. Graduate students only may choose to write in Spanish or Portuguese since their emphasis is on content and not language skills.


Course description: Science fiction, because of its speculative potential and connections to science and technology, constitutes a unique vehicle for understanding the cultural impact of modernization in Brazil. Since industrialization is intimately tied to the military dictatorship (1964-85), its policies and authoritarian development, the course will focus principally on the science fiction written before, during and after the regime. We will examine issues of race, gender, politics and climate change in traditional alien and robot stories and in various subgenres, including cyberpunk, alternate histories and steampunk. Graduate students in the class will also be required to read critical and theoretical texts about genre of science fiction. Among the issues to be addressed are: How can we define science fiction? Is science fiction different in Brazil and Latin America? Why are anthologies of short fiction so popular in Brazil? What are the predominant issues and characteristics of BSF? Can we read traditional or canonical stories through the lens of science fiction? How are Brazilian SF films different from those in the U.S.? How does Brazilian science fiction fit into the global genre of SF?


COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The goal of this course is to understand Brazilian science fiction within the global genre of sf



  • Read selected theoretical and works of science fiction (short novels, films, short stories)

  • Discuss and analyze selected materials in Portuguese

  • Learn to work in a project-based team to carry out assignments

  • Critically evaluate assigned viewings and readings

Students will demonstrate mastery by:



  • Defining their own approach to historical, social and cultural issues of science fiction

  • Writing a critical introduction to a thematic or historical anthology of Brazilian sf

  • Participating debates on the history, social and cultural issues of science fiction

  • Contributing through discussion and debate in team work and presentations


COURSE MATERIALS

  • Copypack: available at Gator Textbooks 374-4500

  • Canvas course website will have PowerPoints and links to books on Reserve at Library West


ASSESSMENT
Grade Scale and Policies

The grade scale for all classes in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies is as follows:



A = 100-93

C(S) = 76-73

NOTE: A grade of C- will not be a qualifying grade for major, minor, Gen Ed, Gordon Rule or Basic Distribution Credit courses. For further information regarding passing grades and grade point equivalents, please refer to the Undergraduate Catalog at https://catalog.ufl.edu/ugrad/current/regulations/info/grades.aspx.

A- = 92-90

C-(U) = 72-70

B+ = 89-87

D+ = 69-67

B = 86-83

D = 66-63

B- = 82-80

D- = 62-60

C+ = 79-77

E = 59-0








Graded Course Components

Undergraduates:


  • Graded component 1: Presentations=15% [5% and 10%]

  • Graded component 2: Typology of Brazilian SF anthologies = 20%

  • Graded component 3: Intro. to an Anthology of BSF = 45% [35% and 10%]

  • Graded component 4: Take-home Final on Student Presentations = 10%

  • Graded component 5: Participation/Canvas Discussions= 10% [5% and 5%]


Graded component 1 = 15%

Description: Presentations—your team will do two presentations at the beginning and at the end of the semester: the first is about on your definition of science fiction 5% (Sept. 1, 6, 8) and a second about your anthology, 10% (Nov. 27, 29 or Dec. 1).



Graded component 2 = 20 %

Description: Your team will write a paper on the typology of three different Brazilian or Latin American Science Fiction anthologies: How are they unified—according to a thematic, historical or comparative perspective? How do they approach each story and author? Who is their prospective audience? What is useful or informative for readers? How do they present authors and the historical context? Which do you prefer and why? Due Oct. 11



Graded component 3 = 45%

Description: Your team will write an introduction to your own anthology of science fiction, choosing a thematic, historical or comparative approach, including Table of Contents of selected stories and author introductions to the stories (35%) 5-10 pages: Due Nov. 8; your team will get a chance to make changes and improvements (10%). Due Nov. 19



Graded component 4 =10 %

Description: Take home final: You will compare your project with that of other students based on their presentations illustrating your grasp of a range of approaches to Brazilian SF, due on or before Dec. 14, 9:30 am via email.



Graded component 5 = 10%

Description Preparation, Participation, attendance: Preparation you will be asked to write a blog/discussion 3 times during the semester and will be given at different intervals throughout the semester (5%); participation: working with your team in class; paying attention, asking questions, participating in discussions, listening respectfully, going to office hours, using time in class to work on project fruitfully, sharing ideas and resources with other students (5%). While attendance to all classes is expected, health and emergencies may interfere. Students must attend office hours and or/ set a meeting to make arrangements for make-up work. Three unexcused absences without penalty. After that a point will be subtracted from the final grade for each absence.


6930 Graduate students will be required to read critical and theoretical texts distributed throughout the semester on Canvas and commented on through the discussions tab


  • Graded component 1: Research Paper = 35%

  • Graded component 2: Introduction to SF anthology = 25%

  • Graded component 3: Canvas Discussion of critical/theoretical material = 25%

  • Graded component 4: Paper outline/Presentation = 10%

  • Graded component 5: Discussion/Participation= 5%



Graded component 1 = 35%

Description 1: Research Paper 10-12 pages, with bibliography, including 3-5 of the articles in the bibliography, along with 10 others: due on or before final exam date Dec. 14, 9:30 am



Graded component 2 = 25%

Description 2: Your team will write a paper on the typology of at least three different Brazilian or Latin American Science Fiction anthologies: How are they unified—according to a thematic, historical or comparative perspective? What critical approach or definition of science fiction is used by the editor? What does this say about the market or approach to science fiction? Oct. 11



Graded component 3 = 25%

Description 3: Canvas discussion of critical/theoretical material: once a week for 10 weeks: Sept. 14-Nov. 18



Graded component 4 = 10%

Description 4: Presentations: Definition of science fiction, (Sept. 1, 6 or 8): Outline of Research paper Nov. 19, Presentation [of Outline] Dec. 4



Graded component 5 = 5 %

Preparation, Participation, attendance: paying attention, asking questions, participating in discussions, listening respectfully to undergraduates, using time in class to work on project fruitfully, sharing ideas and resources with other students. While it is expected that graduate students attend all classes, health and emergencies may interfere. Students must attend office hours and or/ set a meeting to make arrangements for make-up work.


CALENDAR

This calendar is subject to change for pedagogical or logistical motivations. To the extent possible, students will be notified in advance of any such changes.




Dates Week 1

 

Definições de FC, exemplos debate

Homework

schedule

W Aug.

21

O que é a fc? Fantasia? Utopia? Distopia? É uma ótica? Clipes: “Tyger,” “Maracatu Atômico,” Branco sai, preto fica, o seriado 3%

Comprar coletânea
















23

Leia: “Primeiro contato” (2011) “O.M.N.I.” (2012) “Pátria armada” [seleção] (2014)

Canvas















25

Leia: “Flor telefone moça” (1951) “A máquina extraviada” (1968); Causo “FC em perspectiva”




Week 2




Projeto 1: definições de FC




M

28

Leia “Gota de sangue” (2014)

Curta: “Barbosa” debate—fc? Equipes—e antologias






T










W

30

Novum, estranhamento cognitivo, iconografia, utopia, diagrama Venn de Milner




R










F

01

Trabalho de equipe: debates explicar/classificar a FC

Mini-apresentações de equipe—interesses, antologias



10%

PowerPoint



Week 3




Apocalipse, zumbis




Sept.

04

Labor Day – no classes




T










W

06

“A nova Califórnia” Lima Barreto (1910)

“Pirotécnico Zacarias” (1943)



10%

PowerPoint



R










F

08

“A última Eva” (1934) “História com desenho” (2012)

10%

PowerPoint



Week 4




Robôs—sistemas cibernéticas




M Sept.

11

“Zinga o robô” (1963) “O menino e o robô” (1961)




T







6930 Blog 1

Posted


W

13

“O carioca” (1960) “O quarto selo” (1969)




R







Blog 1 due

F

15

“A acensão e queda de Robhéa, manequim e robô” (1975)

“A derradeira publicidade de Hebefrênico Alfredo” (1988)






Week 5




Ciborgues




M Sept.

18

“Julgamentos” (1993) [noveleta]




T







6930 Blog 2 posted

W

20

“Rosas brancas” (2008) “O novo protótipo” (2009)




R







Blog 2 due

F

22

“Uma vida possível atrás das barricadas” (2009) “Meia-noite” (2008)

4930

Week 6




Alienígenas




M Sept.

25

“Ma-Hôre” (1961) “Ukk” (1965)




T







6930 Blog 3 posted

W

27

“Stuntmind” (1989) “A Nuvem” (1998)




R







Blog 3 due

F

29

“Vitória dos minúsculos” “As portas induzidas” (1999)




Week 7




Questões de gênero




M Oct.

02

“Academias de Sião” (1884) “As formigas” (1977)




T







6930 Blog 4 posted

W

04

“Quando é preciso ser homem” (1993) “Vidinha caseira” (1999)




R







Blog 4 due

F

06

Homecoming




Week 8




Projeto 2 /Distopias




M Oct.

09

“A sociedade secreta” (1966) Revisão de projetos-reunião




T







6930 Blog 5 posted

W

11

Estrutura, raciocínio e descrição de antologias-3 pp.

Clipes de Saneamento básico: o filme (2007)



4930/6930

R







Blog 5 due

F

13

“O seminário de ratos” (1977)




Week 9




Questões ecológicas




M Oct.

16

“O homem que espalhou o deserto” (1981) “Fantasmas de Vênus” (1993)




T






Blog 6 posted

W

18

“Os fantasmas de Vênus” (1993) continuação




R







Blog 6 due

F

20

“O sol no coração” (2013)

4930

Week 10




Histórias alternativas




M Oct.

23

“A ética da traição” (1991)




T







Blog 7 posted

W

25

“A ética da traição”




R







Blog 7 due

F

27

“Extinção das espécies” (2010)




Week 11




Ecologia, alienígenas, gênero




M Oct.

30

O par (2008)




T







Blog 8 posted

W Nov.

01

O par




R




Reuniões agendadas

Blog 8 due

F

03

O par Reuniões agendadas




Week 12




Trabalho escrito/O áudio visual e fc




M Nov.

06

Trabalho de equipe-reuniões agendadas




T







Blog 9 posted

W

08

Introdução à antologia “História de amor e fúria” (2012)

4930/6930

R







Blog 9 due

F

10

Veteran’s Day—No classes




Week 13




Filmes clássicos




M Nov.

13

Trabalho de equipe/Esboço pós-graduação

6930

T







Blog 10 posted

W

15

O quinto poder




R







Blog 10 due

F

19

Os cosmonautas/Entrega do projeto antologia revisada/contos 4930; 6930 esboço do trabalho escrito




Week 14










M Nov,

20

Os cosmonautas

4930

T









W

22

Thanksgiving –No classes




R










F

24

Thanksgiving – No classes




Week 15




Abordagens diversas




M Nov.

27

Apresentacões de projetos

10%

T










W

29

Apresentações




R










F Dec.

01

Apresentações




Week 16










M

04

Apresentações-pós




T










W

06

Revisão
















December 14

Thursday


14A

FINAL Comentário dos projetos (takehome) 4930

Trabalho escrito final 6930





POW 6930 Partial BIBLIOGRAPHY for RESEARCH PAPER, Discussion Posts on Canvas

General reference:

Rivkin, Julie and Michael Ryan. Literary Theory: An Anthology. Wiley Blackwell, 2017.


Science Fiction:

Baudrillard, Jean. “The Precession of the Simulacra.” (1981). Science Fiction: Stories and Contexts. Ed. Heather Masri. Bedford St. Martins, 2009. 442-455.

Boluk, Stephanie and Wylie Lenz. “Introduction: Generation Z, the Age of Apocalypse.” Generation Zombie: Essays on the Living Dead in Modern Culture. Ed. Stephanie Boluk and Wylie Lenz. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2011. 1-17.

Botting, Fred. “‘Monsters of the Imagination:’ Gothic, Science, Fiction.” A Companion to Science Fiction. Ed. David Seed. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2005. 111-126.

Brown, J. Andrew. Cyborgs in Latin America. New York: Palgrave, 2010.

Butler Judith. “Performative Acts and Gender Constitution: An Essay in Phenomenology and Feminine Theory.” Theatre Journal 40.4 (1988): 519-531.

Causo, Roberto de Sousa. Ficção científica, fantasia e horror no Brasil 1875-1950. Belo Horizonte, MG: Editora UFMG, 2003.

Ginway, M. Elizabeth. “The Amazon in Brazilian Speculative Fiction: Utopia and Trauma.” Alambique: Revista académica de ciencia ficción y fantasia / Jornal acadêmico de ficção científica e fantasía: 3.1 (2015). http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/alambique/vol3/iss1/3

---. Brazilian Science Fiction: Cultural Myths and Nationhood in the Land of the Future. Lewisburg: PA: Bucknell UP, 2004.

---. “Fictional Trends in Brazil Under Military Rule.” The Brazil Reader. Ed. Robert Levine and John J. Crocitti. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1999. 248-253.

---. “Monteiro Lobato’s O Presidente Negro (The Black President): Eugenics and the Corporate State in Brazil.” Black and Brown Planets: The Politics of Race in Science Fiction. Ed. Isiah Lavender. Jackson, MS: U of Missippi P, 2014. 131-145.

“Recent Brazilian Science Fiction and Fantasy Written by Women.” Foundation 36 (99: Spring 2007) 49-62. Reprinted in Strange Horizons: 23 September 2013. 11

http://www.strangehorizons.com/2013/20130923/2ginway-a.shtml

---. “Teaching Latin American Science Fiction and Fantasy in English: A Case Study.” Teaching Science Fiction. Eds. Andy Sawyer and Peter Wright. New York: Palgrave, 2011. 179-201.

---. “Vampires, Werewolves, and Strong Women: Alternate Histories or the Re-writing of Race and Gender in Brazilian History.” Extrapolation 44.3 (2003): 283-95.



---. “A Working Model for Analyzing Third World Science Fiction: The Case of Brazil.” Science Fiction Studies. 32.3 (2005): 467-494.

---. and J. Andrew Brown, eds. Latin American Science Fiction: Theory and Practice. New York: Palgrave, 2012.

Jackson, Rosemary. Fantasy: The Literature of Subversion. London: Methuen, 1981.

Jameson, Fredric. “Postmodernism, or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism.” The New Left Review 146 (June 1984): 53-91.

Haraway, Donna. “A Cyborg Manifesto.” Simians, Cyborgs and Women: The Reinvention of Nature. London: Free Association Books, 1991. 149-181.

Hayles, N. Katherine. How We Become Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1999.

---. “The Life Cycle of Cyborgs: Writing the Posthuman.” The Cyborg Handbook. Ed. Chris Hables Gray. Routledge,1995. 321-335.

Haywood Ferreira, Rachel. The Emergence of Latin American Science Fiction. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan UP, 2011.

Hollinger, Veronica. “Cybernetic Deconstructions: Cyberpunk and Postmodernism.” Storming the Reality Studio. Ed. Larry McCaffery. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1991. 203-218.

Kadrey, Richard and Larry McCaffery. “Cyberpunk 101.” Storming the Reality Studio. Ed. Larry McCaffery. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1991. 17-29.

Latham, Rob. Consuming Youth: Vampires, Cyborgs and the Culture of Consumption. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2002.

Lauro, Sarah Juliet and Karen Embry. “A Zombie Manifesto: The Nonhuman Condition in the Age of Advanced Capitalism.” Boundary 2 (Spring 2008): 85-108.

McCaffery, Larry. “Introduction: The Desert of the Real.” Storming the Reality Studio. Ed. Larry McCaffery. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1991. 1-16.

Milner, Andrew. Locating Science Fiction. Liverpool, UK: Liverpool UP, 2012.

Monteiro, Luciana C. “Mulheres, mães e alienígenas: Subjetividade feminina na ficcão científica de Dinah Silveira de Queiroz.” Hispania. 96.4 (2013): 724-734.

Rieder, John. Colonialism and the Emergence of Science Fiction. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan UP, 2008.

Suvin, Darko. Metamorphoses of Science Fiction: On the Poetics and History of a Literary Genre. New Haven: Yale UP, 1979.

Vázquez, Karina. “Brazilian Cyberpunk and the Latin American Neo-baroque: Political Critique in a Globalized World.” Luso-Brazilian Review 49.1 (2012): 208-224.

Wolfe, Gary K. The Known and the Unknown: The Iconography of Science Fiction. Kent, OH: Kent State UP, 1979.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES AND RESOURCES

Attendance and make-ups

Requirements for class attendance and make-up exams, assignments, and other work in this course are consistent with university policies that can be found in the online catalog at: https://catalog.ufl.edu/ugrad/current/regulations/info/attendance.aspx


Accommodations

Students requesting classroom accommodation must first register with the Dean of Students Office. The Dean of Students Office will provide documentation to the student who must then provide this documentation to the Instructor when requesting accommodation. For more information see http://www.dso.ufl.edu/drc.


Course Evaluations

Students are expected to provide feedback on the quality of instruction in this course based on 10 criteria. These evaluations are conducted online at https://evaluations.ufl.edu. Evaluations are typically open during the last two or three weeks of the semester, but students will be given specific times when they are open. Summary results of these assessments are available to students at https://evaluations.ufl.edu/results.


Academic Integrity

Suggested wording: “UF students are bound by The Honor Pledge which states, “We, the members of the University of Florida community, pledge to hold ourselves and our peers to the highest standards of honor and integrity by abiding by the Honor Code. On all work submitted for credit by students at the University of Florida, the following pledge is either required or implied: “On my honor, I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid in doing this assignment.” The Honor Code (http://www.dso.ufl.edu/sccr/process/student-conduct-honorcode/) specifies a number of behaviors that are in violation of this code and the possible sanctions. Furthermore, you are obligated to report any condition that facilitates academic misconduct to appropriate personnel. If you have any questions or concerns, please consult with the instructor or TAs in this class.


Resources Available to Students

Health and Wellness

  • U Matter, We Care: umatter@ufl.edu; 392-1575

  • Counseling and Wellness Center: http://www.counseling.ufl.edu/cwc/Default.aspx; 392-1575

  • Sexual Assault Recovery Services (SARS): Student Health Care Center; 392-1161

  • University Police Department: http://www.police.ufl.edu/; 392-1111 (911 for emergencies)


Academic Resources

  • E-learning technical support: Learningsupport@ufl.edu; https://lss.at.ufl.edu/help.shtml; 352-392-4357 (opt. 2)

  • Career Resource Center: Reitz Union; http://www.crc.ufl.edu/; 392-1601

  • Library Support: http://cms.uflib.ufl.edu/ask

  • Teaching Center: Broward Hall; 392-2010 or 392-6420

  • Writing Studio: 302 Tigert Hall; http://writing.ufl.edu/writing-studio/; 846-1138


Procedure for Conflict Resolution

Any classroom issues, disagreements or grade disputes should be discussed first between the instructor and the student. If the problem cannot be resolved, please contact the Undergraduate/Graduate Coordinator or the Department Chair. Be prepared to provide documentation of the problem, as well as all graded materials for the semester. Issues that cannot be resolved departmentally will be referred to the University Ombuds Office (http://www.ombuds.ufl.edu; 392-1308) or the Dean of Students Office (http://www.dso.ufl.edu; 392-1261). For further information refer to https://www.dso.ufl.edu/documents/UF_Complaints_policy.pdf (for residential classes) or http://www.distance.ufl.edu/student-complaintprocess (for online classes).

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