Claudio Franco Kátia Tavares



Baixar 2.06 Mb.
Pdf preview
Página32/35
Encontro16.03.2020
Tamanho2.06 Mb.
1   ...   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35

258 

(FGV/2013) 

Money Talks 

Is  money  a  good  medium  to  spread  messages?  At  first  Alexei  Navalny,  a 

Russian  opposition  activist  and  noted  blogger,  was  skeptical.  But  then  he  did 

the  maths:  if  5,000  Russians  stamped  100  bills  each,  every  citizen  would 

encounter  at  least  one  of  the  altered  notes  as  they  passed  from  person  to 

person.  Members  of  Iran's  Green  Movement  used  this  tactic  in  2009,  writing 

slogans  on  banknotes  during  their  antigovernment  protests.  This  prompted  a 

ruling  that  defaced  notes  would  no  longer  be  accepted  by  banks.  Similarly, 

supporters of the Occupy movement had added slogans and infographics about 


income  inequality  to  dollar  bills.  And  members  of  China's  Falun  Gong 

movement wrote messages on banknotes attacking government persecution. 

The use of money as a communications medium, distributing words and images 

as it passes from hand to hand,  is ancient. The earliest coins,  minted in Lydia 

(now part of Turkey) in the 7

th

 century BC, depicted the head of a lion, thought 



to have been a royal symbol. Later rulers had their names and images inscribed 

on coins, along with symbolic images of various kinds. In the era before printing, 

this was a very efficient way to project their image directly to the people. 

But  their  subjects  were  also  aware  of  the  messaging  power  of  money,  as  the 

recently  revamped  exhibit  on  the  history  of  money  at  the  British  Museum  in 

London reveals. It includes a Roman coin from 215 AD, on which the Christian 

"chi-rho" symbol has been scratched behind the emperor's head; a French coin 

from  1855  overstamped  with  an  advertisement  for  Pear  Soap;  and  a  1903 

British  penny  on  which  Edward  VII's  face  has  been  stamped  with  "Votes  for 

women" by suffragettes. Mr. Navalny's call for Russians to stamp messages on 

banknotes  is  just  the  latest  incarnation  of  a  centuries-old  idea  -  a  pioneering 

example of what we now call social media. 

The Economist, September 29

th

2012. p. 80. (Adapted) 



1.  The  title  of  the  text  -  "Money  talks"  -  is  a  common  saying  in  English  that 

implies one can buy almost anything with money, and it is used here 

a. to show how corruption is spread all over the world. 

b. in order to emphasize the power money brings to those who own it. 

c.  so  as  to  illustrate  how  dictatorial  governments  can  manipulate  the  use  of 

money. 


d. as a word pun, with a different meaning from the one commonly known. 

e. to show that money can buy everything one needs or wants. 

2. Alexei Navalny 

a. collaborated with the protesters of the Occupy Wall Street movement. 

b. was inspired for his actions after seeing an exhibit at the British Museum. 

c. didn't believe in the beginning that his plan would succeed. 



d. was a pioneer in what eventually became a new social media. 

e. helped the Falun Gong movement in China to write messages on banknotes. 

3. The money exhibit at the British Museum 

a. depicts royal and religious symbols from different ages of history. 

b.  displays  documents  from  many  centuries  ago  with  a  wide  variety  of 

messages. 

c. includes the very first coins ever minted by a king. 

d. has Chinese, Iranian, and Russian money, among others. 

e.  shows  the  use  of  currency  to  spread  messages  has  been  happening  for 

centuries. 



259 

4. The first coin minted 

a. had the face of the local king. 

b. appeared before the Christian age. 

c. were meant to make people know who the king was. 

d. portrayed different kinds of symbols. 

e. symbolized Christian values. 

(PUC-RIO/2013) 

Are You A Digital Native or A Digital Immigrant? 

We  all  know  that  we  are  living  in  an  increasingly  technologically  driven  world. 

Living  here  in  the  heart  of  Silicon  Valley  I  certainly  feel  it  every  day.  In  fact,  I 

don't think I know a single couple in my neighborhood, other than my wife and I, 

who  don't  work  in  the  technology  field  in  some  capacity.  Our  local  companies 

are Facebook, Apple, Google, Yahoo, and so many venture capital firms that I 

can't 5 keep them straight. But you don't have to live in Silicon Valley to feel that 

the  world  is  getting  more  and  more  technology  centered,  focused,  and  driven. 

We can debate the pros and cons of this reality but we can't deny that the world 

has changed very quickly in head spinning ways. Two recent comments led me 



to finally enter the 21

st

 century by getting a smart phone this week, kicking and 



screaming. 

First, I mentioned to one of my undergraduate classes at Santa Clara University 

that I didn't have a 10 smart phone, but rather I had a dumb phone. My phone 

can make and receive phone calls and that's about it. No email, internet, and so 

forth. So one of my students looked at me in an odd and curious way, like she 

was  talking  to  someone  from  another  planet,  and  stated  in  a  matter  of  fact 

manner, Professor Plante, even 2

nd

 graders have smart phones." Ouch! 



Second, I was talking with a producer at the PBS NewsHour who wanted me to 

do a live interview 15 within a few hours of his call regarding some late breaking 

news about  clergy sexual abuse,  which  is my specialty.  I  was out  of the office 

and driving my car when he called and in a matter of fact manner he said that 

he  wanted  to  send me  some  important  information  to  my  smart  phone  to  best 

prepare me for the upcoming interview. When I told him that  I  couldn't receive 

anything  since  I  had  a  dumb  phone  and  not  a  smart  phone,  there  was  a  long 

silence.  He  then  said  he'd  have  to  just  read  it  to  me  20  over  the  phone  as  a 

Plan B. He wasn't happy... neither was I. 

In  case  you  haven't  noticed,  the  21

st

  century  is  really  upon  us  and  to  live  in  it 



one  really  does  need  to  be  connected  in  my  view.  Although  I  often  consider 

myself a 19

th

 or 20


th

 century guy trapped in the 21

st

 century we really do need to 



adapt.  For  most  of  us  we  are  just  living  in  a  new  world  that  really  demands 

comfort with and access to technology. 

25 This notion of digital native vs. digital immigrant makes a great deal of sense 

to  me.  Young  people  in  our  society  are  digital  natives.  They  seem  to  be  very 

comfortable  with  everything  from  iPhones  to  TV  remotes.  Digital  immigrants, 

like me, just never feel that comfortable with these technologies. Sure we may 

learn  to  adapt  by  using  email,  mobile  phones,  smart  ones  or  dumb  ones, 

Facebook, and so forth but it just doesn't and perhaps will never be very natural 

for us. It is like learning a second 30 language... you can communicate but with 

some struggle. 

This has perhaps always been true. I remember when I was in graduate school 

in  the  1980s  trying  to  convince  my  grandparents  that  buying  a  telephone 



answering  machine  as  well  as  a  clothes  dryer  would  be  a  good  idea.  They 

looked at me like I  was talking in  another language or that  I  was from another 

planet. 

Perhaps we have a critical period in our lives for technology just like we do for 

language. When we are 35 young we soak up language so quickly but find it so 

much harder to learn a new language when we are older. The same seems to 

be true for technology. 

260 

So, this week I bought my first smart phone and am just learning to use it. When 

questions  arise,  I  turn  to  my  very  patient  teenage  son  for  answers.  And  when 

he's not around, I just look to the youngest person around for help. 

40 So, what about you? Are you a digital native or a digital immigrant and how 

does it impact your life? 

Adapted from  "Digital  Native  vs  Digital  Immigrant? Which  are  you?"  Published 

on  July  24

th

,  2012  by  Thomas  G.  Plante,  Ph.D.,  ABPP  in  Do  the  Right  Thing 



www.psychologytoday.com/blog/do-the-right-thing/201207/digital-native-vs-

digital-immigrant-which-are-you. Retrieved on July 28, 2012. 

1.  The  text  suggests  that  nowadays  the  world  is  divided  into  two  groups  of 

people 


a. those who work in the technology field and those who are against it. 

b. the ones who live in Silicon Valley and those who live in the fields. 

c. the smart phone users and the wireless phone addicts. 

d. those who work for Apple and those who work for Facebook. 

e. the technological natives and the technological foreigners. 

2. The main purpose of the text is 

a. to compare the new smart phones to old conventional devices. 

b.  to  argue  that  people  should  adopt  simple  dumb  phones  for  their  daily 

activities. 


c.  to  highlight  that  young  people  are  usually  technologically  driven  and 

centered. 

d. to analyze the characteristics and the advantages of smart phones. 

e. to prove that old people cannot learn how to use electronic instruments. 

3. In paragraphs 2 and 3, the author reports two incidents he experienced to 

a. declare he has contact with foreign people through his work. 

b. criticize his students' behaviour towards him and his work methods. 

c. tell the reason why he finally adopted a smart phone. 

d. illustrate the negative effects brought by the increasing use of smart phones. 

e. argue against the indiscriminate use of technology in classrooms. 

4. In the sentence "He then said he'd have to just read it to me over the phone 

as a Plan B." (l. 19-20), the underlined pronoun refers to 

Underlined pronoun: it. 

a. the author's dumb phone. 

b. the information needed for the interview. 

c. the author's smart phone. 

d. the upcoming interview. 

e. the conversation the author had with the TV producer. 

5.  Mark  the  CORRECT  statement  concerning  the  meanings  of  the  words 

extracted from the text. 

a. "kicking and screaming" in "... by getting a smart phone this week kicking and 

screaming." (l. 8) means "revolutionary". 

b. "odd" in "So one of my students looked at me in an odd and curious way, ..." 

(l. 11-12) means "respectful". 

c. "late breaking news" in "I was talking with a producer (...) some late breaking 

news" (l. 14-15) means "tragic news". 



261 

d.  "a  critical  period"  in  "Perhaps  we  have  a  critical  period  in  our  life  for 

technology" (l. 34) means "a threatening moment". 

e. "soak up" in "When we are young we soak up language so quickly (...)" (l. 34-

35) means "absorb". 

6.  Paraphrasing  the  sentence "In  case  you  haven't  noticed,  the  21

st

  century  is 



really upon us and to live it one really does need to be connected in my view" (l. 

21-22), we can say that 

a. the future is here and we must be connected to the world. 

b. the present century has come to make things more difficult for people. 

c. everybody understands that technology is necessary to survive on Earth. 

d. people should try to escape the new century's negative effects. 

e. digital natives have not noticed that they need to be connected. 

7. The author explains the expression "dumb phone" (l. 10) as 

a. a phone used by those who are digital natives. 

b. a phone which does not have internet access. 

c. a phone that can communicate with people from another planet. 

d. a phone specially designed for second graders. 

e. a phone designed for those who have hearing problems. 

8.  "We  can't  deny"  in  "...we  can't  deny  that  the  world  has  changed  very 

quickly..."  (l.  6-7)  and  "My  phone  can  make"  in  "My  phone  can  make  and 

receive phone calls..." (l. 10) express the ideas of, respectively: 

a. probability - duty. 

b. condition - ability. 

c. obligation - assumption. 

d. possibility - obligation. 

e. impossibility - ability. 


9.  The  author  uses  the  expression  "a  matter  of  fact  manner"  (l.  12  and  l.  16) 

twice in the text. Inferring from the context in which it is used, "a matter of fact 

manner" is 

a. a way of saying that something is expected. 

b. like saying things very loudly. 

c. a manner of affirming that someone is wrong. 

d. equivalent to saying things politely. 

e. a way of declaring that one thing is absurd. 

10. Mark the INCORRECT option concerning the statements. 

a.  The  author's  resistance  to  using  a  smart  phone  is  comparable  to  his 

grandparents' resistance to using a clothes dryer. 

b.  In  the  author's  opinion  we  can't  avoid  dealing  with  technology  in  the  21

st

 

century. 



c. Teenagers are much more familiar to the digital world than adults are. 

d. When he bought a smart phone, the author immediately got adapted to using 

it. 

e. The author has recently faced some problems for not using a smart phone. 



262 

(UNICAMP/2013) 

Photoshopping Our Souls Away 

By Sarey Martin McIvor 

FONTE: Reprodução/UNICAMP, 2013. 

In  2011,  the  American  Medical  Association,  the  most  respected  group  of 

medical  professionals in  the  U.S., took  a public  stance  against  the  way  media 

"corrects"  photographs  of  humans,  arguing  that  it  is  a  leading  cause  of 

anorexia, the third most common mental chronic disorder in adolescents. 

It's  bad  enough  that  most  models  are  part  of  a  gene  pool  and  age  group  that 

encompasses  a  very  small  percentage  of  the  population.  But  now,  they  are 


photographing  these  folks  and  manipulating  their  skin,  their  weight,  and 

proportions  to  make  them  into  perfect  alien  life  forms  that  exist  only  in  a 

computer. 

Adaptado  de:  http://darlingmagazine.org/author/sarey-martin-mcivor/.  Acesso 

em: 5 maio 2016. 

a. O que fez a American Medical Association em 2011 e por quê? 

b. Justifique o título do texto. 

(UECE/2013) 

Hundreds  of  studies  have  assessed  leadership  styles,  mainly  by  having 

employees  report  on  how  their  managers  typically  behave.  Researchers  have 

also  collected information on how effective managers are.  After large numbers 

of such studies became available, reviewers aggregated them quantitatively to 

discover what kinds of leadership are effective. 

One conclusion that has emerged based on the research of the past 30 years is 

that  a  hybrid  style  known  as  transformational  leadership  is  highly  effective  in 

most contemporary organizational contexts. 

A  transformational  leader  acts  as  an  inspirational  role model, motivates  others 

to  go  beyond  the  confines  of  their  job  descriptions,  encourages  creativity  and 

innovation,  fosters  good  human  relationships,  and  develops  the  skills  of 

followers.  This  type  of  leadership  is  effective  because  it  fosters  strong 

interpersonal bonds based on a leader's charisma and consideration of others. 

These  bonds  enable  leaders  to  promote  high-quality  performance  by 

encouraging  workers  rather  than  threatening  them,  thus  motivating  them  to 

exceed basic expectations. 

By  bringing  out  the  best  in  others,  transformational  leaders  enhance  the 

performance of groups and organizations. 

Transformational  leadership  is  androgynous  because  it  incorporates  culturally 

masculine  and  feminine  behaviors.  This  androgynous  mixing  of  the  masculine 

and  feminine  means  that  skill  in  this  contemporary  way  of  leading  does  not 

necessarily come naturally. It may require some effort and thought. 



Men  often  have  to  work  on  their  social  skills  and  women  on  being  assertive 

enough to inspire others. It is nonetheless clear that both women and men can 

adapt to the demands of leadership in the transformational mode. 

263 

One  of  the  surprises  of  research  on  transformational  leadership  is  that  female 

managers  are  somewhat  more  transformational  than  male  managers.  In 

particular,  they  exceed  men  in  their  attention  to  human  relationships.  Also,  in 

delivering  incentives,  women  lean  toward  a  more  positive,  reward-based 

approach  and  men  toward  a  more  negative  and  less  effective,  threat-based 

approach.  In  these  respects,  women  appear  to  be  better  leaders  than  men, 

despite the double standard that can close women out of these roles. 

Why  are  women  leaders  more  transformational  when  they  are  less  likely  to 

become leaders in the first place? One reason is that the double standard that 

slows  women's  rise  would  work  against  mediocre  women  while  allowing 

mediocre  men  to  rise.  As  a  consequence,  the  women  who  attain  leadership 

roles really are better than the men on average. 

It is also true women generally avoid more domineering, "command and control" 

behavior because of the backlash they receive if they lead in this way. Men can 

often  get  away  with  autocratic  behavior  that  is  roundly  disliked  in  women. 

Ironically, this backlash against domineering women may foster good leadership 

because  the  androgynous  middle  ground  is  more  likely  to  bring  success. 

Leaders gain less from ordering others about than from forming teams of smart, 

motivated collaborators who together figure out how to solve problems and get 

work done. 

Disponível em: 

1. As to the leadership pattern that requires attitudes based on features of both 

male and female behaviors, one may infer that it 

a. is the easiest way, for it is what someone would normally do. 

b. brings satisfaction to people under command, but not to the leader. 

c. leads managers to avoid it because of prejudice. 

d. makes leaders reflect and struggle to become skillful in this way of leading. 



2.  According  to  the  research  results,  women  tend  to  do  better  in  terms  of  the 

application of the transformational type of leadership because of their 

a. longer hours of work at the office. 

b. very assertive and sometimes intimidating approach. 

c. considerate and rewarding way of dealing with people. 

d. attitude in relation to men under their command. 

3. Further exploring the apparently paradoxical reasons why women leaders are 

more successful in transformational leadership than men, the text mentions the 

fact that 

a.  because  of  gender  inequality,  only  women  who  are  really  good  get  leading 

positions. 

b. women seem to have a better performance in job interviews. 

c. men are usually more willing to get jobs done when led by women. 

d.  due  to  gender  issues,  leading  women  usually  try  to  make  men  seem 

mediocre. 

4.  Among  the  factors  that  make  transformational  leadership  effective,  the  text 

mentions 

a. the increasing equality of treatment for men and women. 

b. the connection established with people based on respect and motivation. 

c. a return to traditional strategies long forgotten in the business world. 

d. the extensive use of coercive behavior disguised in new roles. 

264 

5.  As  to  the  effectiveness  of  managers,  researchers  have  found,  after  many 

years of study, that 

a. an inspirational style can encourage creativity among mediocre men. 

b. masculine behavior leans toward a reward based approach. 

c. the androgynous pattern seems to be preferred by men. 

d. the so-called transformational style is very positive in many contexts. 


6. Women  usually  refuse  to  behave  in  a  domineering  way  due  to the fact  that 

they 


a. think it is unlikely to bring success. 

b. receive backlash when they lead in this manner. 

c. prefer to make believe they are treating collaborators in a friendly way. 

d. dislike any kind of threat-based approach. 



Gabarito das questões de vestibular 

(Fuvest/2015)  a.  Em  1998,  o  então  presidente  Fernando  Henrique  Cardoso 

disse  que  pretendia  triplicar  a  área  de  preservação  da  Floresta  Amazônica. 

Naquele ano, o desmatamento das florestas no Brasil chegava a 20 mil km

2

 por 



ano. Em 2014, com o projeto Arpa em vigor, menos de 6 mil km

2

 ao ano eram 



desmatados.  Além  disso,  em  maio  de  2014,  o  governo  e  um  grupo  de 

financiadores  concordaram  em  financiar  o  projeto  Arpa  por  25  anos.  b.  O 

projeto Arpa é um conjunto de parques nacionais e outros trechos de florestas 

protegidos  que  totalizam  uma  área  de  preservação  20  vezes  maior  que  a 

Bélgica.  Além  de  ser  o  maior  projeto  de  preservação  de  florestas  tropicais  da 

história,  ele  pode  sinalizar  um  ponto  de  mudança  na  triste  história  do 

desmatamento tropical. 

(UFSC/2014) QUESTÃO 17 (Proposições corretas: 1, 8, 16) 25; QUESTÃO 18 

(Proposições corretas: 4, 8) 12; QUESTÃO 19 (Proposições corretas: 2, 16, 32) 

50; QUESTÃO 20 (Proposições corretas: 1, 2) 3. 

(UFSC/2013)  QUESTÃO  16  (Proposições  corretas:  1,  4,  8,  16,  64)  93; 

QUESTÃO 18 (Proposições corretas: 2, 4, 8) 14. 



(FGV/2013) 1. d; 2. c; 3. e; 4. b. 

(PUC-RIO/2013)  1.  e  (the  technological  natives  and  the  technological 

foreigners).  O  texto  busca  distinguir  dois  tipos  de  usuários  de  tecnologia: 

aqueles que nasceram em um mundo marcadamente dominado pela influência 

de aparelhos eletrônicos e da digitalização (os tecnológicos nativos), e aqueles 

que,  por  pertencerem  a  uma  geração  que  não  cresceu  fazendo  uso  tão 

ostensivo  e  intensivo  da  tecnologia,  tiveram  que  se  adaptar  ao  ritmo  e  às 



necessidades  de  uma  vida  dominada  pela  tecnologia  (os  tecnológicos 

imigrantes ou estrangeiros). 

2.  c  (to  highlight  that  young  people  are  usually  technologically  driven  and 

centered). A ideia principal do texto é reforçar a noção de que as pessoas mais 

jovens,  de  acordo  com  a  percepção  do  autor,  são  geralmente  mais 

direcionadas e hábeis em lidar com a tecnologia que domina o nosso cotidiano. 

3.  c (tell the reason why he finally adopted a smart phone). Os  dois episódios 

que  o  autor  nos  reporta  no  texto  (a  conversa  com  a  aluna  de  graduação  e  a 

conversa  com  o  produtor  do  programa  no  qual  ele  vai  dar  uma  entrevista)  se 

configuram como os dois principais motivos que o levaram a aderir ao uso do 

"smartphone".  4.  b  (the  information  needed  for  the  interview).  O  pronome  it 

resgata,  ao  fazer  referência,  a  informação  de  que  o  autor  do  texto  precisará 

para participar da entrevista para a qual ele está sendo convidado por telefone. 


Baixar 2.06 Mb.

Compartilhe com seus amigos:
1   ...   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35




©bemvin.org 2020
enviar mensagem

    Página principal
Prefeitura municipal
santa catarina
Universidade federal
prefeitura municipal
pregão presencial
universidade federal
outras providências
processo seletivo
catarina prefeitura
minas gerais
secretaria municipal
CÂmara municipal
ensino fundamental
ensino médio
concurso público
catarina município
Dispõe sobre
reunião ordinária
Serviço público
câmara municipal
público federal
Processo seletivo
processo licitatório
educaçÃo universidade
seletivo simplificado
Secretaria municipal
sessão ordinária
ensino superior
Relatório técnico
Universidade estadual
Conselho municipal
técnico científico
direitos humanos
científico período
Curriculum vitae
espírito santo
pregão eletrônico
Sequência didática
Quarta feira
prefeito municipal
conselho municipal
distrito federal
língua portuguesa
nossa senhora
educaçÃo secretaria
segunda feira
Pregão presencial
recursos humanos
Terça feira
educaçÃO ciência
agricultura familiar